IDEA Foundation Pursues Brain Wave Research

 IDEA Foundation pic
IDEA Foundation
Image: idea.am

CEO of TrinityTEK Racing Development Sean Southland has spent nearly three decades building a career as a scientific researcher and health care professional. Particularly interested in improving quality of life for those who have neurological conditions, Sean Southland serves as co-founder and president of the IDEA Foundation.

Since its inception, the IDEA Foundation has maintained a dedication to making a difference in the lives of people diagnosed with autism, as well as a wide spectrum of other neurological conditions. The foundation fulfills its mission by supporting the research of innovative therapy processes such as brain mapping.

Using quantitative electroencephalograph (QEEG) technology, the IDEA Foundation has pursued the study of brain waves in patients who experience neurological disorders. QEEG devices provide accurate maps of the frequencies and distribution of waves inside the brain. Different types of waves can help researchers determine which condition a patient may be experiencing. For example, those with attention deficit disorder (ADD) typically exhibit high activity of delta frequency waves and low activity of alpha waves. Recognizing that patients need a balance of all the various types of brain waves, the IDEA Foundation has used its research to develop such innovative therapies as a combination of EEG, interactive tasking systems, and biofeedback technology.

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The Impact and Signs of Autism

Autism pic
Autism
Image: Autismspeaks.org

Arizona resident Dr. Sean Southland divides his time between TrinityTEK Racing Development and the International DriverX Elite Academy (IDEA). Dr. Sean Southland serves as an administrator at the latter and oversees operations as well as its foundation.

Through the IDEA Foundation, TrinityTEK Racing Development helps spread awareness about autism spectrum disorder (ASD). A disorder impacting brain development, ASD is diagnosed in approximately one in every 68 children in the United States, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. In fact, ASD has increased exponentially in the past four decades, impacting more males than females. It is estimated that more than 3 million people in the U.S. live with ASD.

ASD symptoms vary by person. However, common signs include communication challenges and repetitive behaviors. Likewise, diagnosed individuals may find it tough to engage in social interactions. This can be identified in children as young as 8 months old. A child that does not respond to his or her name and fails to babble may have ASD. Difficulty participating in social games and emotional disconnection as a toddler are other symptoms.